Cub Creek Road & A Feisty Female

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Sweeping Vista showing several land formations

Taking Cub Creek Road is a great way to see the canyons and land formations that are as much a part of Dinosaur National Monument as the dinosaur quarry is.  For $1.00 you can buy a guide that explains the tour.

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Signs correspond to the Auto Guidebook you can purchase at the Visitor’s Center

Swelter Shelter

Here people left stone tools and animal bones.  Its the oldest site of human occupation in the park, going back about 7,000 year ago.  These people are known as the Desert Archaic culture.  The Fremont people, who lived here about 1,000 years ago created the rock art here and in other parts of the park.

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The Fremont People built this rock area for food storage

Pictographs are paintings on the wall, petroglyphs are scratched designs.

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Pictures of Scenery

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The Tilted Rocks of Split Rock

At one point these layers were flat but underground forces moved them upwards.  “the ancient Green River sat in a riverbed thousands of feet above where it is today.  It flowed high above Split Mountain when the mountain was buried in dirt.  Over time the Green River cut through the soft dirt and eventually struck the rock erosion resistant top of Split Mountain.  By then, however, the river was held in place by its banks.  It could not change course when it hit the top of Split Mountain.  It cut through the mountain instead of diverting round it. ”  (Copied from Tour of the Tilted Rocks, Auto Guidebook for the Cub Creek Road)

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Looking down at Split Mountain Campground. We ate lunch here. Would be a lovely place to camp.

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View from the campground where we ate
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This little lizard was sunning himself on our picnic table

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Turtle Rock – Note the rock across from him that looks like a turtle shell

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This rock is called elephant toes
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Big Skys!

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Josie Morris, Single Woman Homesteader

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Josie Morris’ cabin and homestead are at the end of the tour.  She’s a local hero, a status she certainly deserves.  We’ve had movies about many men of the old west why not Josie?  She settled here in 1914 after five divorces, which in itself would make her shunned by many people of her day.  The story goes that she ran the last one off with a frying pan, although the rumors were that she had killed him.  She later said he was a good man but drank too much.  Living here alone much of the time she had lots of visitors, her son and his family also lived here for awhile.  She survived hot dry summers and freezing cold winters.  Her home had several rooms, she had pictures on the walls and homemade rag rugs on the floor.  She knew many of the outlaws of the day including Butch Cassidy who had a hide out somewhere in these hills.  She said when the outlaws came to visit they were always gentlemen to her and always closed her gate.  She raised vegetables and canned them, raised chickens, pigs and geese.  She was accused of cattle rustling in her 60’s but not convicted.  Evidently she came to court dressed like a lady and charmed her way through the process.  She lived until she was 89 and only left her homestead after breaking her hip, which lead to her eventual death.  I don’t remember hearing about Josie in American history class, in high school or college.  In my opinion she would be a great addition to any history about the American West.

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Riding her horse
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The view out of Josie’s back door
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Josie’s fence
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This lovely vine has climbed the tree

 

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Tending her garden. Josie wore pants and kept her hair short.
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Josie posing by her gate. She has a kind expression on her face.
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Me striking a Josie pose